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Stanhoe school, before 1942

Stanhoe_00603.jpg Reggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of DoreenReggie Ayres with dogThumbnailsPolly Ayres ouside the end cottage in Post Office Yard. Mary Jane Ayres, known as Polly, and her husband Robert were the parents of Stanley, XX and Reggie, and grandfather of Doreen

Stanhoe school before it was seriously damaged by a falling tree in October 1941.

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  • Gillian Beckett (Gillian) - Friday 14 October 2011 17:21
    I agree that the suggestion of the damage caused being by the fall of the big elm branch is the likely reason for any re-building and slight alteration of the building. The picture seems as if it should be pre-war.

    The item concerning Scott's Pasture has no connection with the school. This was another name for what is now Chapel Field adjoining Cross Lane, the site of the medieval Chapel of St. Peter.
  • Pamela Austin - Wednesday 12 October 2011 15:52
    All interesting stuff, and the comment above reminds me that i've heard Scotts pasture referred to before, but don't know its location...........?
  • Charles Butcher (Charles) - Tuesday 11 October 2011 12:17
    The school managers' minutes of 10 November 1941 refer to "…the serious damage to the School by a fallen tree on Oct 18th." The next set of minutes in the book are from the meeting of 18 July 1944.
  • Arthur Walker - Tuesday 11 October 2011 08:43
    I am rather surprised to learn that there that there is no record of the disaster that befell the school in 1941/2.
    One Friday night during a severe North-Westerly gale a lime tree was blown over and demolished the junior end of the school The tree can be seen in the picture and was growing close to the boys toilets. There were at that time six or seven lime trees growing in the infants playground adjacent to the boundary wall.
    Eventually lessons were given in the village hall and for a few months Scotts pasture was the playground.
    When the school reopened it had been completely renovated and all the lime trees had been taken away roots and all. I wonder if that was when the railings were updated?
    I cannot remember seeing any photographs of the disaster but I wonder if it has been recorded in the Lynn News and Advertiser
  • Gillian Beckett (Gillian) - Wednesday 5 October 2011 15:38
    Is this really Stanhoe School? It is certainly a typical school, but all the details of the building and the fence are wrong for Stanhoe as are the trees. If it is our village, it must be a very old photo as there is no mention in the school records of such a re-build in the last 100 years. Intereting.